Raft Point and Ruby Falls

Where is Raft Point?

Nestled in the southern entrance of Doubtful Bay, you’ll find Raft Point. This area of Dambimangari Country (the region spreads for 1.4m hectares) is home to one of the Kimberley’s most accessible outdoor art galleries.

Where can I see Indigenous Art? Where can I see Windjina Art?

The 1st recorded slighting of Windjina art in the Kimberley’s was by George Grey, an explorer, in 1837. They are believed to be over 4,000 years. One fascinating explanation I received regarding the dating of the art involved carbon dating a fossilised wasp’s nest. As it was on top of the Windjina art and it dated more than 4000 years old; more accurate dating of the art was possible.

How do I see Raft Point?

The only way to see the legendary artwork is by taking a cruise along the Kimberley Coast. There is a short sharp climb you need do to get to the overhanging rock so make sure that you had your breakfast beforehand. While the climb is a little arduous, any effort and sweat are well worth it.

On finding the gallery, you will be rewarded with images telling stories of Wandjina spirits with haloes, The Great Fish Chase and pictures of crocodiles, dugongs and snakes.

The Dambimangari, the people who created these images, are considered ‘saltwater’ people. In the past, they used rafts (hence the name of this place) and canoes to go about their day to day lives.  Hunting, fishing and trading were conducted all along this part of the coastline.

After taking in the artwork, you can enjoy some visual gems, this time by Mother Nature. Standing by the gallery, you are afforded a wonderful view looking out over Steep Island.

Can I fish at Raft point?

As well as being home to the iconic Boab tree with its bulbous trunk and spindly branches, Raft Point is a superb spot for fishing. It is here that you will find Vinney’s Creek and hope to hook a Barramundi – famed for growing up to 1.8m in size. If you’re lucky, Threadfin Salmon could also be on the menu.

Alternatively, if catching fish isn’t your thing, Raft Point is an ideal place for crabbing and bird watching. You may spot some of the Mangrove Whistlers, Robins, Shining Flycatchers, Cuckoos, Kingfisher, Rail and Herons as well as birds of prey. So, don’t forget to pack your binoculars.

Where is Ruby Falls?  Can I swim at Ruby Falls? 

Tours of this area often continue to Ruby Falls named after the daughter of Skipper, Chris ‘Tippy’ Tucker. It’s here that you can cool off with a refreshing swim or, if you’re exhausted from climbing up to the gallery, sit back on the water-worn rocks and take in the beauty of the area. Well above the ‘croc line’ guests often report that a dip at Ruby Falls is made all the more enjoyable as the pool is filled with water lilies.

Around the falls are rock walls which are great for climbing and clambering over before reaching a series of freshwater swimming holes and waterfalls. Depending on the time of the year, the falls may be a gurgling torrent or a gentle trickle.

What is a Ruby Falls Ring?

If a trip to Ruby Falls has put you in a romantic mood, or you just want to get the ‘souvenir of all souvenirs’, you’ll be interested in learning that there’s something suitable to buy from ‘Jewels of the Kimberley.’ Their Ruby Falls ring is made of an Argyle pink diamond set alongside dazzling white diamonds. A unique way to remember a trip to a ‘gem’ of a place.

Raft Point and Ruby Falls are regularly visited on Kimberley coastal cruises. For more information on the different cruise options please see a list of the vessels that we work with here.


Jenny Flower is an expert in small ship cruising in the Kimberley and has completed four cruises on different vessels along this spectacular coastline. To book in a no obligation ‘discovery call’ about Kimberley cruising click here. If you are confused about all the different ships and itineraries in the Kimberley and just need some general information to start your research then download Jenny’s free guide to Kimberley cruising here.